Archive by Author

Special K’s “More than a number campaign”

5 Nov

 

The Special “K” organization aired a commercial in 2013 inviting everyday women to try on jeans in a local boutique. These women were not the typical size 0 or 2, they were average looking healthy women. When the women were asked to try on jeans they were very hesitant. They were seemingly embarrassed to be sized for their “perfect fit jeans” because they knew that their size wasn’t a 0,1 or 2. There hesitation is due to the media overloading(ads, television programs, movies, magazines) the people with deceiving images.These images are infecting the minds of people by giving them an unrealistic, unhealthy portrayal of what “beauty” is. Women are always concerned with what size they are, and what the scale at home reads when they step onto it. This isn’t problem that only white, black, Latina,younger or older women deal with, it is a issue that too many women face. Women are continuously compared to images of rail thin models that are 5’11 105 lbs., etc. and are being compared to digitally altered pictures. The “More than a number” campaign blossomed the pro-social concept of eating healthy,acceptance of diversity, loving yourself, calming fears, and moreover, benefits not only women, but society as a whole. Instead of being told they were “x” size, the women were told they were size “fantastic”, “radiant”, “beautiful”, “fabulous”; the numbers that are typically used were replaced with positive words, feelings, etc.  

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Pro-social images such as this allows people to venture outside of the typical dominant ideological characteristics and mindsets that we have become entirely too familiar with. Pro-social media can aid in many things such as: acceptance of others, behavior alternatives, etc. Without pro-social images, television shows, video games, etc. we have little chance to progress as a people.

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The more pro-social imagery expands, so will the thoughts, attitudes, beliefs, of those who view it. There is far too much self-hatred, violence, racism, classicism, sexism, and any other “ism” I forgot to mention going on in the world today, but with awareness, time, and more exposure to positive pro-social imagery (ideas & concepts), the people of the world will advance in terms of cognitive reasoning/thinking, explore alternative behavior expression, and become more tolerant and loving toward one another.    

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Tim Wise Reflection

28 Oct

The lecture given by Tim Wise regarding white privilege and the American dilemma on race was nothing short than spectacular. I was surprised at how appalled I felt. His choice of words, tone, topics, and sincerity were powerful. He began the lecture stating that he isn’t the most qualified person to be speaking on this matter, but because he “luckily” fits the dominant group characteristics; being white, male, heterosexual, he has unfairly been given the opportunity to speak all around the country on a matter that he has never experienced firsthand. This statement opens the floor for his topics, but also urged everyone at the lecture to listen to someone who has experienced racism because they would have more to tell and teach on the matter than he ever could. There were no elements of his lecture that I disagreed with, I viewed his teachings as absolutely credible. During this semester, professor Banjo has asked our class to take a step back and “look at the big picture” for what it is. She has asked that we critically think and analyze what film, television programs, advertisement, and news, is “really” telling us. We have been asked to dig beneath the surface of what we see and read, and analyze it for what it actually is saying, and its effects. Tim Wise also wanted his audience to take a step back and look at the “bigger picture”. Tim Wise spoke of many things that I have learned this semester, especially how much we’re are all being held back by the dominant group and their dominant ideologies. To be more specific, Tim Wise spoke of institutional racism, shocking labor department data, the invisible war on drugs, personal experiences, and the suffrage of black and brown people, the suffrage of women, inside networking, and many other issues. After listening to his lecture and attending the media and identity course this semester, I realized the American people have been blinded on issues of repression, misrepresentation, and racism. The media supports the inequality of human beings, may it be through comedies, dramas, romance, etc. So many of us don’t realize how poorly the media represents people of color, which is a direct reflection of what he called “white privilege”. I, a white women, have never had to think of what it was like to be discriminated against based on the color of skin. The “not having to know” is the problem. The media and identity course as well as Tim Wise has taught me that the realities of others differ so greatly than the realities of the dominant group. People of color, people of different class, women, men, gays and lesbians, and people that practice religions other than Christianity are being spoken for and represented by the dominant group; a group that has discriminated against them, and who also differ from them in almost every way possible. This isn’t just in movies or television shows, this is a part of peoples 2013 everyday lives. There is a veil of ignorance we have over our eyes in relation to other’s realities; white privilege. We are allowing a very small uniformed dominant group to make our laws, represent us, provide our entertainment, sculpt our culture etc.  We are told that we live in the greatest country on earth, but the fact remains that repression isn’t a thing of the past. Racism, sexism, classicism, religious discrimination, and all other prejudices exists in our schools, work force, neighborhoods, police departments, court of law, in our own homes, and in all forms of entertainment. We must take that “step back” Tim Wise and professor Banjo have spoken of to truly realize the world we live in, and the injustices that are continuously ignored. We have to understand the world in order to change it. 

How I Met Your Mother: Rebound Bro

2 Oct

 

 

 

The show I chose  to analyze Is called How I Met Your Mother. This comedy television show airs on CBS (as well as other networks) prime time slot. It is a prolonged story that has a unique framing which tells viewers and Ted Mosby’s children how he met their mother. Each episode is a different story, that at first glance seems depth-less, but somehow Ted finds a wisdom filled lesson at each end of every episode. The show involves a close group of friends; Barney is a successful worker for a bank(his position is unknown), Lily, a loving kindergarten teacher, Ted, a successful architect, Marshall, a lovable lawyer, and lastly, Robin, an attractive news anchor. The episode focused on Ted being upset with Barney, and Barney desperately trying to find a new “wing” man. Ted is busy pursuing his new girlfriend, and the entire episode focuses on the comedic despair of Barney not able to find another best friend like Ted. This episode, and every other episode, shows the group of friends in their hang out spot at Murphy’s bar, and in Lily,Marshall, and Ted’s home. There is an absolute absence of any other race in their “close knit” circle.

 

There is a display of “whiteness” and privilege due to their ability to conform in public spaces to private spaces such as the two listed previously. The visual rhetoric of their grouping and of the absence of racial variety speaks very loudly. It infers that the in-penetrable white group of five are the “ones” in power. It also infers that they are the articulate educated ones, the “only” ones worth viewing. All episodes, including the one I watched weren’t about society, or the problems of the world, etc, it was about these five people, and only their problems, thoughts, expressions, etc. Their “whiteness” is shoved in our faces our viewers even though we may not be able to see it first hand. In the end of the episode Barney finds the maturity he needs to let Ted “go”, and Ted speaks of the new exciting relationship he has found. To conclude, whiteness, privilege, superiority, closed circle of friends,and the absence of racial variety limits has led me to dislike this show entirely. Their whiteness reflects in their jobs, their clothing, economic status,ability to have their “home hang out spot” transfer over to their “bar hang out spot” (insinuating privilege) etc., and also the exclusion of “others who are not white” in their tight circle of friends speaks to me in a negatively. The cast is given this “invisible cloak” (whiteness) that makes them better than everyone else.This is again, another reflective example of the ideological dominant vision that controls media. Being a rich, white, heterosexual, Christian male is what is viewed as better and/or best. I’m assuming the creators of this far from entertaining show are all of those things just listed, if i hadn’t been receiving a grade for watching this episode, I would have said I had wasted thirty minutes of my life. 

 

 

The show I chose to analyze Is called How I Met Your Mother. This comedy television show airs on CBS (as well as other networks) prime time slot. It is a prolonged story that has a unique framing which tells viewers and Ted Mosby’s children how he met their mother. Each episode is a different story, that at first glance seems depth-less, but somehow Ted finds a wisdom filled lesson at each end of every episode. The show involves a close group of friends; Barney is a successful worker for a bank(his position is unknown), Lily, a loving kindergarten teacher, Ted, a successful architect, Marshall, a lovable lawyer, and lastly, Robin, an attractive news anchor. The episode focused on Ted being upset with Barney, and Barney desperately trying to find a new “wing” man. Ted is busy pursuing his new girlfriend, and the entire episode focuses on the comedic despair of Barney not able to find another best friend like Ted. This episode, and every other episode, shows the group of friends in their hang out spot at Murphy’s bar, and in Lily,Marshall, and Ted’s home. There is an absolute absence of any other race in their “close knit” circle.

 

There is a display of “whiteness” and privilege due to their ability to conform in public spaces to private spaces such as the two listed previously. The visual rhetoric of their grouping and of the absence of racial variety speaks very loudly. It infers that the in-penetrable white group of five are the “ones” in power. It also infers that they are the articulate educated ones, the “only” ones worth viewing. All episodes, including the one I watched weren’t about society, or the problems of the world, etc, it was about these five people, and only their problems, thoughts, expressions, etc. Their “whiteness” is shoved in our faces our viewers even though we may not be able to see it first hand. In the end of the episode Barney finds the maturity he needs to let Ted “go”, and Ted speaks of the new exciting relationship he has found. To conclude, whiteness, privilege, superiority, closed circle of friends,and the absence of racial variety limits has led me to dislike this show entirely. Their whiteness reflects in their jobs, their clothing, economic status,ability to have their “home hang out spot” transfer over to their “bar hang out spot” (insinuating privilege) etc., and also the exclusion of “others who are not white” in their tight circle of friends speaks to me in a negatively. The cast is given this “invisible cloak” (whiteness) that makes them better than everyone else.This is again, another reflective example of the ideological dominant vision that controls media. Being a rich, white, heterosexual, Christian male is what is viewed as better and/or best. I’m assuming the creators of this far from entertaining show are all of those things just listed, if i hadn’t been receiving a grade for watching this episode, I would have said I had wasted thirty minutes of my life. 

Blog 2 Class : Goodnight Gracie : Modern Family

23 Sep

 

 

 

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Modern Family is a popular sitcom that airs on ABC during prime time hours. Modern Family is a comedic show that revolves around the lives and experiences of three family’s. The eldest member of all three families is a rich, successful white man named Jay. His family consists of his second wife Gloria; who is a young, beautiful, stay at home Latina mother,her son from a past relationship (Manny), and her and Jay’s newborn son Joe. The other family consists of Jay’s only daughter (Claire), Claire’s husband Phil, their two daughters (Alex , Haley) and their son Luke.Phil is a very successful  real estate agent, and Claire is a stay at home mother. The other family consist of Jay’s only son Mitchel; who is homosexual, and his partner Cameron. Cameron is a music teacher and Mitchel is lawyer.  Even though Modern Family choose to use homosexual characters, those two characters chosen to be white, educated rich men. The thought that first came to my head when watching the opening credits were that they were white, rich, family oriented, and very happy. 

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The episode I watched was titled “Goodnight Gracie”. It was about Phil’s mother passing away, and all three families traveling to Florida for the funeral. The episode also focused on Mitchel representing Gloria in a Florida courtroom regarding a false accusation of prostitution.It is absolutely obvious what class all three families belong to before you even get “into”the story. All three families are members of the upper-class. When the characters are introduced in the television normal opening, they are all pictured together in front of their n=beautiful LA homes, hugging one another in an absolute loving “cookie cutter” way. All family members appear to dress with elegance. The women wear nice jewelry, the men wear suits and/or business casual clothing, and the children all seemed to be wearing nice, currently in-fashion clothing. Modern Family is famous for what some call a “mockumentary style”; which is when the characters are being recorded sitting down and speak straight into the camera  by telling their thoughts or feelings about whatever is happening around them. When the camera is used to do this mockumentary moment, the characters beautiful home and expensive looking things are always in the background. 

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Modern Family is unfortunately another show that emphasizes the all to common “dominant ideology”; patriarchal, capitalistic, white, Christian way of living. Modern Family shines light on the realities of rich, upper-class, white people and normalizes their way of life. All three families are always shown looking physically good, happy, going to or coming from work, traveling to vacation like places such as Florida at a moments notice. All characters drive nice cars, have nice things, and seem very happy with their chosen lives. The characters were shown going to Florida for a funeral, a seemingly normal thing people do within their lifetime, but Modern Family portrayed this very differently. The funeral was held outside by a lake, many people attended, and their were even fireworks at the end of the funeral service because July 4  was the deceased favorite holiday. The capitalistic ideology of the the “American Dream”, rugged individualism, and the protestant work ethic were present within the thirty minutes it took to watch the show,  

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Blog 1: Mistresses

12 Sep
Focus: Femininity & Sexuality
 
Summary: I watched an episode of Mistresses that airs Wednesdays on ABC at 9:00 pm.Mistresses is a show sculpted around four very attractive women, and their complex “love” lives. These women are all in their 30’s, and are upper-class. Savannah is a  white, beautiful, a lawyer, wealthy, and is pregnant. She had an affair with another man in a past episode, so she has no idea if her husband is the father. She is separated from her husband, but they are waiting to find out who the father is. Joss is her little sister, she is tall, white, out-going real estate agent. Karen, a  beautiful Asian women, and is a doctor that had slept with one of her married patience in past episodes. April, a gorgeous black women and mother to a beautiful little girl. She owns a cafe and believes she is a widow, but has learned that her husband faked his own death and in doing so committed fraud. He has started an entirely new family, but has had a change of heart and wants her back. The episode starts with the lonely separated Savannah trying to figure out who sent her flowers for her birthday; none of her close friends had sent them to her. She began to obsess over who sent the flowers, was it her husband, the man she slept with at her work, a secret admirer. Her friends decided to take a weekend road trip to Palm Springs to celebrate. The episode ends with Savannah being in a horrible car accident while driving to pick up her paternity results. She found out that her husband was not the father of her baby, and it was in fact the man she worked with child. Dr. Karen was also visited by the crazed, drunken, enraged widow of the patient she had slept with ( that died in a past season). Dr. Karen not only slept with this women’s husband, she slept with the women’s only son. This women shows up completely distraught to Karen’s house right before she is going to leave for Palm Springs with a gun; her motive is to kill the women that ruined her life, and stole the last months of her husbands life. 
Analysis/Application: The reality of  upper-class, educated, predominantly white heterosexual men and women are most prevalent and common in this show. Their life style is portrayed as most powerful and common. The representation of this “reality” best serves those individuals that believe in and/or idolize the dominant ideology of white, rich, heterosexual, Christian. This show benefits those people who are considered that “have’s” vs. the “have-not’s”. This show benefits women that believe they “need” men to survive. Unfortunately, audiences will look at these women and unrealistically compare the way they physically look to other women and/or themselves.I fear that the objectification of women and their sexuality will go unnoticed because the public is practically numb to it. Audience members may look at the women having complicated relationships as a notion that when women aren’t in a “stable” heterosexual relationship, they are in fact unstable both mentally, emotionally, and physically. 
 
Conclusion: This episode suggest that women need the stability of a heterosexual romantic relationship in order to have a happy/proper fulfilled life.